Tag Archive: surreal


Iain Macarthur

Iain Macarthur (born 1986) is an English illustrator whose online portfolio boasts a number of styles and commissions. This piece comes from his ‘Surreal’ category, where realistic portraiture is melded with intricate patterns and designs. Macarthur uses pencil, watercolor and pigment pens for his completed works and like all diligent artists carries a sketchbook with him at all times. Reminds me of a quote by William Sprague: “Do not wait to strike till the iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.” See more of Macarthur’s stuff here: iainmacarthur.carbonmade.com/

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Maia Flore

“Sleep Elevations series”: French photographer Maia Flore is a recent graduate of the Ecole des Gobelins and currently resides in la ville des lumières, Paris. Her Sleep Elevation series (of which the artist says “I did not want to disconnect from the dream and never realize it”) is full of whimsy: young girls suspended through different modes of flight and fancy. Another quote: “My inspiration are things that I actually want to experience. I live my world vicariously though my photos.” See more from this burgeoning photographer on her website: www.maiaflore.com

Georges Bousquet

“Etrange Famille” (2010): The dreamscapes of digital artist Georges Bousquet (from Perpignan, France) achieve a dizzying depth – one feels they could peel back infinite levels of the image and find more childlike figures and surreal subjects returning the gaze. In fact, Bousquet uses about 300 layers in Photoshop and spends approximately 15 hours building each image. Recently he re-envisioned the twelve signs of the Zodiac with his unique spin. His work deserves close-up inspection; see the details on his Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/casajordi/

Ray Caesar

The mind of London-born digital artist Ray Caesar was warped at an early age, perhaps when he began sleeping with a book of Dali’s paintings under his pillow. Caesar combines traditional portraiture with surrealism, resulting in a bizarre juxtaposition of beautiful and repugnant subjects: most often precocious little girls with half-hidden disfigurements, time-traveling teens with hinted smiles at the corner of their red-painted mouths. Caesar refutes that his pictures are of children, but rather that they are “of the human soul, that alluring image of the hidden part of ourselves”. Take a moment to get lost within his website, where an animated gramophone will play a dreamy and liturgical soundtrack for your exploration of this incredibly alluring artist: http://www.raycaesar.com/

“Day Break” (2008)

“Madre” (2006)

“Sleeping By Day” (2004)